Erik lie backdating study

Rated 4.9/5 based on 841 customer reviews

(For more insight, see ) Although it may appear shady, public companies can typically issue and price stock option grants as they see fit, but this will all depend on the terms and conditions of their stock option granting program.However, when granting options, the details of the grant must be disclosed, meaning that a company must clearly inform the investment community of the date that the option was granted and the exercise price. In addition, the company must also properly account for the expense of the options grant in their financials.The Wall Street Journal (see discussion of article below) pointed out a CEO option grant dated October 1998.The number of shares subject to option was 250,000 and the exercise price was (the trough in the stock price graph below.) Given a year-end price of , the intrinsic value of the options at the end of the year was (-) x 250,000 = ,750,000.

(Under APB 25, the accounting rule that was in effect until 2005, firms did not have to expense options at all unless they were in-the-money.

The SEC’s opinions regarding backdating and fraud were primarily due to the various tax rules that apply when issuing “in the money” stock options vs.

the much different – and more financially beneficial – tax rules that apply when issuing “at the money” or "out of the money" stock options.

ESOs are usually granted at-the-money, i.e., the exercise price of the options is set to equal the market price of the underlying stock on the grant date.

Because the option value is higher if the exercise price is lower, executives prefer to be granted options when the stock price is at its lowest.

Leave a Reply